Thirteen Octoquads – Shaped UV inkjet on Composite Aluminum – Ohio Arts Council ADAP Grant “The Shape of Things to Come”

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Thirteen Octoquads I, 2019
UV inkjet on composite aluminum panel 
cnc router shaped perimeter w/ interior cut-outs
Ed. of 3 @ 60 x 60 inches
(note: fabrication pending)
Detail

I’m pleased that my application “The Shape of Things to Come” to the Ohio Arts Council for the Artists With Disabilities Access Program (ADAP) grant has been approved for funding. The Ohio Arts Council does amazing work for artists and the arts in the state of Ohio and I greatly appreciate their support. This is the first work I will be producing with the grant.

Below is an excerpt from my OAC ADAP Grant application:

With this grant, I will create 4 artworks, printed on rigid substrates as opposed to media of the traditional digital print (paper/canvas). Printing on rigid substrates opens up a new avenue of exploration in my work by allowing my geometric constructs to expand beyond the confines of square and rectangular formats with use of a Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Router that can cut the substrate panel to my specifications”.

This work, titled “Thirteen Octoquads”, is the first piece I’m making with the grant funding.

I’ve been working with a variety of geometric shapes, weaved with color. Putting them together in new and unexpected ways challenges me, always with the goal of the composition to elicit a visually energetic and joyful optical experience from the viewer.

I realized that I hadn’t ever worked with Octagons. Why not, I asked myself. So, while I was resting, I imagined turning the octagon into a flower with eight squares being its petals, each projecting from it’s respective segment of the octagon. The resulting arrangement, with triangular spaces left between each adjacent square, provides a link to connect them together. The space left in the middle of 4 linked octoquads provides for smaller flowers with a radiating arrangement of 8 white diamonds. 4 of these flowers surround the central pink octoquad (see detail above).

The image above is the digital file and not the final piece. I will send the file that I’m readying to printer for fabrication.

Click here to visit the Ohio Arts Council website

LGBT Community Center Art Installation

The new LGBT Community Center of Greater Cleveland, located in the Gordon Square Arts District on Cleveland’s west side, opened on June 14 and I’m so proud to have my art installed in this beautiful building designed by David Thal of WMF Architects. The work titled “Fifty Three Rhombuses” at 118″ x 56″ is printed on a composite aluminum panel and shaped by CNC router.

With spaces and programs to serve the LGBT community in a variety of ways, the building is a safe and open beacon in the community. I want to thank Phyllis Harris (Executive Director LGBT Community Center Cleveland), Mindy Tousley (Executive Director Artists Archives of the Western Reserve), David Thal (Architect), and the late David Ream for making it possible to come to life.

David Thal (architect) and me
from left: Shae London (center staff), David Thal (architect) and Phyllis Harris (executive director of the center)
My husband Bruce Baumwoll and me
A view of the building at twilight (under construction photo)

Ninety One Kites in the Summa Healing Arts Collection For New Patient Tower

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I’m honored to be a part of Summa Health’s new Healing Arts Collection for the new Patient Tower at the Akron campus. Special thank you to Meg Harris Stanton, curator – Summa Health Healing Arts Leadership Council, for selecting my work “Ninety One Kites” where it has been placed on the fifth floor across from the nurses station. Really like it’s location. Not only do patients and visitors benefit from the arts in healthcare, staff especially does so. Also, a special thank you to Christine Havice, Chair, Summa Health Healing Arts Leadership Council. With her background as an arts educator in art history, journalist, curator and consultant, she researched and wrote about each artist, artwork and the artists process. With dedicated web page’s for each, it’s a great resource to view and study the collection. Below is excerpt of what she wrote on my page:

After viewing this print, you may also find his reflections helpful in negotiating the visual arts world of today, where both digital and the older “analogue” techniques co-exist and often, as here and in certain other works of art in the Summa Collection, interpenetrate in new and exciting ways.

Christine Havice

click here to see my page

Below are some great works in the collection.

New Summa Health Akron Campus New Patient Tower. Sculpture in foreground “Beacon of Well-Being” by Stephen Canneto , photo: summahealth.org
Diana Al-Hadid
A Way with Words, 2019
Materials: Polymer gypsum, fiberglass, steel, plaster, gold leaf, aluminum leaf, copper leaf, pigment, 160.5 x 96 x 5.5”.
From left: Cliff Deveny, M.D., Diana Al-Hadid and David Custodio, M.D., during Al-Hadid’s art installation in the new tower on the Summa Health System — Akron Campus
photo: summahealth.org
Shane Wynn
Pictured, from left:
Neema & Phul
Asha & Furaha
from the North Hill series, 2018
MaterialsColor digital print, 48 x 32”.
Location at Summa Health: New patient tower (141 N. Forge St.), hallway, second floor.
photo: summahealth.org
Marvin Jones
Untitled, undated
Materials: Mixed media monoprint  37 3/8 x 24 5/8”.
photo: summahealth.org

The Collection