Sun Shown Again On Another Broadcast of CBS Sunday Morning

screenshot of the sun as it appeared on the June 23, 2019 broadcast of CBS Sunday Morning

A sun I submitted to CBS was shown on the CBS Sunday morning broadcast on March 31, 2019 following a story about wrongfully convicted artist Richard Phillips who created art in prison for decades.  So I was astonished when I got an email with the subject line “We’re using your sun again tomorrow” from Jessica Frank with CBS Sunday Morning and she said:

I wanted to let you know that your yellow and black sun, which is SO cool, will appear on our Sunday Morning broadcast tomorrow, at the end of a story that we’re doing on Street Wear. It’s the perfect ending.

On Sunday morning June 23, 2019 the sun aired for the second time on the show at the end of the Street Wear Segment which you can see below.

LGBT Community Center Art Installation

The new LGBT Community Center of Greater Cleveland, located in the Gordon Square Arts District on Cleveland’s west side, opened on June 14 and I’m so proud to have my art installed in this beautiful building designed by David Thal of WMF Architects. The work titled “Fifty Three Rhombuses” at 118″ x 56″ is printed on a composite aluminum panel and shaped by CNC router.

With spaces and programs to serve the LGBT community in a variety of ways, the building is a safe and open beacon in the community. I want to thank Phyllis Harris (Executive Director LGBT Community Center Cleveland), Mindy Tousley (Executive Director Artists Archives of the Western Reserve), David Thal (Architect), and the late David Ream for making it possible to come to life.

from left: Shae London (center staff), David Thal (architect) and Phyllis Harris (executive director of the center)
David Thal (architect) and me
My husband Bruce Baumwoll and me
A view of the building at twilight (under construction photo)

Ninety One Kites in the Summa Healing Arts Collection For New Patient Tower

click on image to enlarge (except mobile phones)

I’m honored to be a part of Summa Health’s new Healing Arts Collection for the new Patient Tower at the Akron campus. Special thank you to Meg Harris Stanton, curator – Summa Health Healing Arts Leadership Council, for selecting my work “Ninety One Kites” where it has been placed on the fifth floor across from the nurses station. Really like it’s location. Not only do patients and visitors benefit from the arts in healthcare, staff especially does so. Also, a special thank you to Christine Havice, Chair, Summa Health Healing Arts Leadership Council. With her background as an arts educator in art history, journalist, curator and consultant, she researched and wrote about each artist, artwork and the artists process. With dedicated web page’s for each, it’s a great resource to view and study the collection. Below is excerpt of what she wrote on my page:

After viewing this print, you may also find his reflections helpful in negotiating the visual arts world of today, where both digital and the older “analogue” techniques co-exist and often, as here and in certain other works of art in the Summa Collection, interpenetrate in new and exciting ways.

Christine Havice

click here to see my page

Below are some great works in the collection.

New Summa Health Akron Campus New Patient Tower. Sculpture in foreground “Beacon of Well-Being” by Stephen Canneto , photo: summahealth.org
Diana Al-Hadid
A Way with Words, 2019
Materials: Polymer gypsum, fiberglass, steel, plaster, gold leaf, aluminum leaf, copper leaf, pigment, 160.5 x 96 x 5.5”.
From left: Cliff Deveny, M.D., Diana Al-Hadid and David Custodio, M.D., during Al-Hadid’s art installation in the new tower on the Summa Health System — Akron Campus
photo: summahealth.org
Shane Wynn
Pictured, from left:
Neema & Phul
Asha & Furaha
from the North Hill series, 2018
MaterialsColor digital print, 48 x 32”.
Location at Summa Health: New patient tower (141 N. Forge St.), hallway, second floor.
photo: summahealth.org
Marvin Jones
Untitled, undated
Materials: Mixed media monoprint  37 3/8 x 24 5/8”.
photo: summahealth.org

The Collection

Wire – – Less

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Wire – – Less, 2019
UV cured inkjet on composite acrylic/aluminum panel
38 x 76 inches, edition of 3

In the past I’ve worked with circles organized as a matrix of dots but a regularized grid (x and y are equal) makes the axis of diagonal rows of dots at an angle of 45 degrees. So, I thought, what would happen if the grid was modified to make the axis at 60 degrees. I further thought, how could I create a further sense of movement. I substituted circles with ovals and rotated them along the long axis at a 30 degree angle giving them some tension.

For a little insight into my process, above is also sketch of mathematical layout in pixels I worked out first. This allows me to place guidelines in photoshop at 300 pixels vertically and 173 pixels horizontally giving me the accuracy I need to construct it.

For this first piece using this grid and rotated ovals, I spell out the words Wire Less. At first glance it could be read as wireless, a nod to the ubiquitousness of wireless technology. But another reading is Wire – Less; a message to metaphorically unplug once and a while.